Enforcing Court Orders

What is enforcement?

Enforcement is a lawsuit filed against a person for violating a court order. Court orders may be enforced by different means, including asking a judge to hold a person who violated the order “in contempt of court.” A person found in contempt of court may be fined or placed in jail for the violation. Not all court orders are enforceable by contempt.

What orders can be enforced?

The following orders may be enforced by a family district court:
a. child support;
b. access/possession of a child (visitation);
c. property division; and
d. spousal maintenance (sometimes called alimony)

When can a court enforce an order by contempt or by other means?

A court can enforce a child support order by contempt if the motion for enforcement is filed not later than the second anniversary after the date the child becomes an adult or the date on which the child support obligation terminates under the order. Also, a court can enforce a child support order without contempt by confirming the total amount of child support owed and rendering a money judgment for that amount provided the motion for enforcement is filed not later than the tenth anniversary after the date the child becomes an adult or the date on which the child support obligation terminates under the order.

Free Consultation

Pinkerton Red Star Icon
Start Fighting For Your Rights Today!
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.